773-878-2445
  1. What are orthotics and prosthetics?
  2. Are appointments required?
  3. Who is responsible for the fees for my visit?
  4. Do you accept Medicare and Public Aid?
  5. What is Public Aid "prior approval"?
  6. What other types of insurance do you accept?
  7. Who files the insurance claim?
  8. What should I bring to my appointment?
  9. What is the turnaround time for my device?
  10. What is Ballert’s policy for repairs and/or adjustments?
  11. What is a certifited orthotist?
  12. What type of special training does a certified orthotist receive?
  1. What are orthotics and prosthetics?
    Orthotic devices are braces or other appliances designed to immobilize portions of the body to facilitate recovery and healing. They may be custom-made from casts or prefabricated. Prosthetic devices are artificial limbs and their accessories.
  2. Are appointments required?
    Yes, we ask that you make an appointment so that we can match you with practitioner who specializes in treating the reason for your visit. Additionally, the appointment gives us time to verify insurance coverage, thereby avoiding potential payment problems down the road.
  3. Who is responsible for the fees for my visit?
    Most patients are covered in part or in full by their insurance. Prior to your first appointment, we will verify your coverage and notify you of any portion you may be responsible for (including co-pays and deductibles). Remember, too, that insurance reimbursement is never a sure thing until the payments are received. Therefore, the amount you are responsible for will be reassessed once the insurance claim(s) have been paid. Because every patient’s policy is different, we encourage you to familiarize yourself with the terms of your policy. If you have questions about coverage, you may want to phone your company and ask a representative.
  4. Do you accept Medicare and Public Aid (Medicaid)?
    Ballert accepts both Medicare and Public Aid. Please be aware, however, that Medicare and Public Aid do not cover all orthotic and prosthetic devices. Additionally, Public Aid requires “prior approval” for many of the devices they cover (see answer to next question). If we discover non-coverage of your device when we verify your insurance coverage, we will inform you prior to providing services. Additionally, there are some items for which Ballert does not take assignment. If this is the case with you device, we will inform you prior to providing any services.
  5. What is Public Aid "prior approval"?
    For some procedures, Ballert may have to get approval from Public Aid prior to making and delivering the device or treatment. “Prior approval” allows Public Aid to determine whether the procedure is “medically necessary,” according to their review panel. For such procedures, Ballert may elect to wait until approval has been granted before making and/or delivering the device. This practice protects the patient against being responsible for paying the bill. Rest assured, however, that Ballert’s expert administrative staff is able to turn around prior approvals very efficiently.
  6. What other types of insurance do you accept?
    In addition to Medicare and Public Aid (Medicaid), Ballert accepts most HMOs, PPOs, and other commercial insurances. Please check our provider list. If you have further questions about coverage, please call us at 773-878-2445.
  7. Who files the insurance claim?
    Because of the complexities of insurance reimbursement, most of our patients prefer for Ballert’s billing experts to file insurance claims on their behalf. Our collections experts have often advocated successfully on the patient’s behalf when claims have been denied initially.
  8. What should I bring to my appointment?
    When you schedule your appointment over the phone, the scheduler will ask you to bring your insurance card(s), your driver’s license (or other photo identification), your prescription and/or referral, and, if payments will be collected, some means of paying for them (cash, check, money order or VISA or Mastercard). Please arrive for your appointment a few minutes early, to allow time for completing a patient information sheet, which asks for such information as name, address, phone number, and social security number. If your visit is for a repair or adjustment, don’t forget to bring your device.
  9. What is the turnaround time for my device?
    For orthotics, the turnaround time will depend on several factors. If the device is custom made, you can generally expect a two-week turnaround time. If the device is prefabricated, you can expect delivery the following week. Remember that delivery of devices for Public Aid patients may be delayed by the “prior approval” process (see above).
  10. What is your policy for adjustments and/or repairs?
    All of our devices come with a 90-day warranty, during which time repairs and adjustments are free of charge. If you need a repair or adjustment after the warranty period, charges may apply. Normally, out-of-warranty repair or adjustment charges are not covered by typical insurance policies.
  11. What is a certifited orthotist?
    A certified orthotist is an allied health professional who is specifically trained and educated to provide or manage the provision of custom-designed, fabricated, modified and fitted external orthoses (braces) to orthotic patients. The selection of the orthosis is based on clinical assessment and the physician’s prescription, in order to restore physiological function and/or cosmesis. Orthotists have been fitting braces including cranial helmets for over 100 years in the United States.

  12. What type of special training does a certified orthotist receive?

    A certified orthotist go through extensive training to learn how to evaluate, cast, fabricate and fit orthoses (braces). There are only a handful of universities in the United States that have programs for the field of orthotics and these programs must meet stringent criteria set by the American Board for Certification. Once an orthotist finishes the formal educational portion of training, he or she begins a residency program under the supervision of a certified practitioner to gain practical experience. A year’s experience and references are required before the resident can submit an application to take both a written and a practical examination. When a resident passes the exam he can use the credentials of C.O. (certified orthotist).